Menu

E9-1-1 Regulations


E9-1-1 Regulations

FCC E911 Regulations

sealrgb-wires-fixedThe Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has established a set of rules and regulations that require interconnected VoIP service providers to deliver E9-1-1 services to their subscribers. Interconnected VoIP service providers connect the IP realm and the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), allowing subscribers to benefit from increased efficiency by routing calls over the internet.

The regulations established by the FCC are mandatory for all interconnected VoIP service providers, and are designed to protect the safety of VoIP users who expect that when they dial 9-1-1, emergency responders know exactly where they are and will quickly arrive on-scene. Specifically, the FCC requires VoIP service providers to:

  • Deliver all 9-1-1 calls to the local Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP), along with the subscriber’s call back number and location information (where the PSAP is capable of receiving it).
  • Offer subscribers a simple and easy way to update their registered physical location, should it change.
  • Inform subscribers of the capabilities and limitations of the E9-1-1 service they provide.

To view the FCC Rules and Regulations for VoIP 9-1-1, click here (http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/voip911order.pdf).

State E911 Legislation

Many states are adopting legislation to regulate 9-1-1 service as it applies to Multi Line Telephone Systems (MLTS) or PBXs (Private Branch Exchanges). Some states now require enterprises and/or residential MLTS operators to ensure that when a user calls 9-1-1 on their system, ANI (Automatic Number Identification) and ALI (Automatic Location Identification) are provided to the PSAP (Public Safety Answering Point).

The following are general summaries of applicable state legislation and/or regulations, as well as links to the legislation or regulations themselves. These summaries should not be taken as official records of state law, but are instead for informational use only.

For a downloadable summary please Click Here.

State Description
Alaska MLTS operators must deliver to the PSAP a 9-1-1 caller’s location including at least the building address and floor of the caller; they must also ensure that 9-1-1 can be dialed without requiring users to dial the prefix 9. Details and exemptions are outlined as well. Learn More
Arkansas MLTS operators must deliver to the PSAP the phone number and street address of any telephone used to place a 9-1-1 call. Details and exemptions are outlined as well. Learn more: http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/arcode/Default.asp
• Accept Terms and Conditions by clicking “Ok – Close”
• Expand Title 12
• Expand Subtitle 2
• Expand Chapter 10
• Expand Subchapter 3
• Select 12-10-31
California The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has instructed Local Exchange Carriers to provide customers with an advisory brochure regarding MLTS E9-1-1. Additionally, the CPUC continues to advocate the adoption of MLTS E9-1-1 legislation that would require various system types to provide E9-1-1 service with automatic routing, ANI, and ALI. Learn more: http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/PublishedDocs/Published/G000/M072/K133/72133561.PDF
http://docs.cpuc.ca.gov/PublishedDocs/Published/G000/M072/K301/72301174.pdf
Colorado MLTS operators shall provide written information to their end-users describing the proper method of dialing 9-1-1, when dialing an additional digit prefix is required. MLTS operators that do not give the ANI, the ALI, or both shall disclose this in writing to their end-users and instruct them to provide their telephone number and exact location when calling 9-1-1. Learn more
• Accept Terms and Conditions by clicking “I Agree”
• Select Colorado Revised Statutes
• Expand Title 29
• Expand “Miscellaneous”
• Expand Article 11
• Expand Part 1
• Select sections 29-11-100.5 and 29-11-106
Connecticut A private company, corporation or institution may provide private 9-1-1 service to its users, provided it has adequate resources, the approval of the Office of State-Wide Emergency Telecommunications and the municipality in which it is located, and a qualified private safety answering point. Learn more.
Florida All PBX systems installed after January 1, 2004 must be able to provide station-level ALI data to the PSAP. Learn more
Illinois Private residential switch service providers must identify the telephone number, extension number, and the physical location of a 9-1-1 caller to the PSAP. Private business switch service providers must provide ANI and ALI data for each 9-1-1 call, and must not require the dialing of an additional digit prefix (systems installed after July 1, 2015); the level of detail required for ALI data, exemptions and guidelines to establish a private emergency answering point are outlined as well. Learn more: http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=741&ChapterID=11
http://ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/083/08300726sections.htmlM
http://ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/083/08300727sections.html
Kentucky Residential private switch telephone service providers located in E9-1-1 capable areas must provide ANI and ALI data for each 9-1-1 call, and must provide ALI that includes the street address, plus an apartment number or floor, if applicable. Learn more
Louisiana PBX systems installed after January 1, 2005, must be capable of providing station-level ALI data to the PSAP. Learn more
Maine Residential MLTS providers must deliver a distinct ANI and ALI for each living unit to the PSAP. Business MLTS providers must deliver ANI and ALI to the PSAP; specific ALI data requirements are outlined. Also includes requirements for hotels/motels, exemptions and guidelines to establish a private emergency answering point. Learn more: http://www.maine911.com/laws_rules/rules.htm
Maryland MLTS operators must not require the dialing of any additional digits to access 9-1-1 as of December 31, 2017. Learn more
Massachusetts All new or substantially renovated MLTS must route emergency calls to the appropriate PSAP and provide an ANI and ALI for every 9-1-1 call. The level of detail required for ALI data and exemptions are outlined as well. Learn more
Michigan Providers of private switch equipment or services for businesses are required to ensure their system provides ANI and ALI for all 9-1-1 calls, no later than December 31, 2019. Location identification requirements are outlined. Learn more
http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(cwfsuaivb42s2qh121vr1a1f))/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=mcl-484-1405
Minnesota Requires operators of MLTS purchased after December 31, 2004 to ensure that their system provides ANI and ALI for each 9-1-1 call. Residential MTLS should provide one distinctive ANI and one distinctive ALI per residential unit. Location identification requirements for businesses are outlined. Also includes requirements for hotels/motels, schools, exemptions and guidelines to establish a private emergency answering point. Learn more
Mississippi Service providers must provide callers with access to the appropriate PSAP. Anyone operating a shared tenant service is required to provide the ANI and ALI for each 9-1-1 call made from any extension. Exemptions are outlined as well. Learn more
Nebraska Proposes the implementation of state-wide E9-1-1 service by July 1, 2010, but includes no specific requirements for MLTS as of yet. Learn more
New Hampshire Telephone and VoIP service providers, as well as hotels, motels, hospitals, universities and potentially others, must deliver the 9-1-1 call with the ANI to the appropriate PSAP. http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/VII/106-H/106-H-mrg.htm
http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/xxxiv/378/378-mrg.htm
Ohio House Bill 525 (i.e. Kari’s Law) requires that 9-1-1 calls from MLTS systems can be placed without dialing 9 or another digit in advance. This bill has been referred to Committee in the Ohio Legislature for review. Learn more
Oklahoma Business owners or operators using VoIP service must allow a 9-1-1 call on the system to directly access 9-1-1 without an additional code, digit, prefix, postfix, or trunk-access code, and must provide a notification to a central location when someone on their network dials 9-1-1. Details and exemptions are outlined as well. Effective January 1, 2017. : Learn more
Pennsylvania Shared residential MLTS operators must deliver 9-1-1 calls to the PSAP with one distinctive ANI and ALI for each living unit. Business MLTS operators must deliver the 9-1-1 call with an ANI and ALI detailed to the building and floor location of the caller, or must establish a private emergency answering point. Details, notification requirements and exemptions are outlined as well. Learn more
Tennessee “Shared Tenant Service Providers” (“any basic local exchange service subscriber who shares or resells basic local exchange service”) must ensure that their system provides ANI and up-to-date ALI for every 9-1-1 call. Learn more
Texas MLTS operators who serve residential users and facilities must provide the same level of 9-1-1 service as received by other residential users in the same regional plan area, including ANI. Business owners or operators using VoIP service must allow a 9-1-1 call on the system to directly access 9-1-1 without an additional code, digit, prefix, postfix, or trunk-access code, and must provide a notification to a central location when someone on their network dials 9-1-1. Details and exemptions are outlined as well. Learn more: http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/HS/htm/HS.771.htm
http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/HS/htm/HS.771A.htm

Tarrant County, Texas, requires that MLTS providers offering residential or commercial service to non-affiliated businesses must provide the level of 9-1-1 service as required under the appropriate regional plan. Businesses must provide the PSAP with ANI and ALI data for each 9-1-1 call. Details, including location identification requirements for businesses and exemptions, are outlined as well. Learn more: http://www.tc911.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Excerpt-from-Texas-Health-and-Safety-Code-772-218.pdf

Vermont Privately-owned telephone system operators must provide ANI signaling and station-level ALI data to the PSAP. Exemptions are outlined as well. Learn more
Virginia MLTS providers must ensure that an emergency call placed from any telephone is delivered to the PSAP with ANI and ALI, or an alternative method of providing call location information. Exemptions are outlined as well. http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/56-484.19
http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title56/chapter15/section56-484.20/
http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title56/chapter15/section56-484.21/
http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title56/chapter15/section56-484.22/
http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title56/chapter15/section56-484.23/
http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title56/chapter15/section56-484.25/
Washington Residential service providers must ensure that an emergency call placed from any caller is delivered to the PSAP along with a unique ALI for their unit. Business service providers must ensure that an emergency call placed from any caller is delivered to the PSAP along with a unique ALI for their telephone. Exemptions are outlined as well. Learn more: http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=80.36.555
http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=80.36.560

CRTC E911 Regulations

CRTC_LogoThe Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) has established decision 2007-44, which requires VoIP service providers to make 9-1-1 services available to their fixed/non-native and nomadic VoIP subscribers. VoIP service providers connect the IP realm and the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), allowing subscribers to benefit from increased efficiency by routing calls over the Internet.

The CRTC decision obliges VoIP service providers to deliver all 9-1-1 calls to the appropriate Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) using the zero-dialed emergency call routing service (0-ECRS), rather than PSAP low-priority lines. Adherence to this decision is mandatory for all VoIP service providers offering services in Canada, and is designed to protect the safety of VoIP users who expect that when they dial 9-1-1, they will quickly be connected to qualified emergency responders.

To view CRTC decision 2007-44, which establishes the regulations for VoIP 9-1-1 in Canada, click here (www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2007/dt2007-44.htm).


West Corporation

utility-side-menu